Social career of women  

 

Photo 34: children are eating

Rufo

 

 

 

Photo 35: girlfriends

Rufo

 

 

 

Photo 36: Baro and first born

Rufo

 

 

Photo 37: akka, widow, baski

Rufo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arbore’s rhythm of life is determined by day and night, rainy and dry seasons. Agesets and Generationsets, including the corresponding stages of socialization, define the social career. The following example outlines the typical progression of the female social career:

Infants are called morqo. Neither male nor female morqo are seen as individuals. Between the age of 2 and 3 the girl begins to be called haraté. There is no ritual for this passage. With the grade of haraté starts the integration of the girl into working life and her acceptance as an individual.

Somewhere along the way the haraté marries. Sometimes it is love, sometimes an arrangement. With the rite of passage sud, the girl (haraté) becomes a bride (utante). She moves to the hut of her parents in law and there will be tested. After some months follows the concluding marriage ritual min gussin (building a house). After a strongly ritualized wedding night, the utante is called sallé (woman). Now she is “the mother of the youngest” (i.e. the unborn).

If the marriage fails or the husband dies the woman is called baski. A baski is a woman on the margins of society. She has special rights, for example she may quite openly have lovers . But it is not possible for her to get the full acceptance of society that married women have.